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We live in a healthy building?

Most existing buildings contain and release pollutants into the environment

Indoor pollution

In parallel with the growing desire to improve the quality of life and environmental sustainability of buildings, we are thinking about the problem of improving the air quality in the environments in which we live.

There is also indoor pollution (indoors) in homes, offices, schools, shops and shopping centres. There is also an indoor pollution one, related to industrial workplaces, but regulated by specific laws.
Here, however, we will take care of indoor pollution in: homes, businesses and public buildings.

Install, breath and live healthy. Your Sistem Air's life.

Do you know pollutants?

Read and learn more about the causes that can lead to indoor pollution-related diseases.

Chronic respiratory diseases

Air pollutants

Related diseases

Chronic respiratory diseases

Among the chronic diseases affecting the world population, respiratory diseases, asthma and allergies represent a wide range of serious pathological conditions, forecast to increase in coming years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the increase in the frequency of these pathologies is correlated to changes in lifestyles, urbanization phenomena and the growing tendency of Western populations to live most of the time in closed (indoor), poorly ventilated environments, with hot-humid microclimates and presence of high levels of chemical pollutants and allergens. In the most recent decades, the attention of the scientific and institutional world has turned particularly to the problems related to air quality of confined (indoor) environments and an ever greater sensitivity

and awareness has developed on the importance of health problems and typical comforts of confined spaces. A topic of particular interest and of considerable social relevance is the one concerning the relationship between indoor air pollution and the respiratory health of people who spend a lot of time in closed environments used for living, leisure, study, work and transport. n fact, the respiratory system is the entry door to various airborne indoor contaminants. These are mainly products of combustion, biological / bioaerosol agents (viruses, bacteria, fungi, pet products, etc.), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), Radon (and products of its decay) and Carbon Monoxide.

Where air pollutants are present

In general, pollutants are present in indoor air in concentrations such that, although they do not cause acute effects, they are nevertheless the cause of negative effects on human well-being and health, especially if they are linked to an extended exposure time.

Complex mixtures of pollutants, even at low concentrations, can cause harmful effects on the health of susceptible people over time: children, pregnant women, elderly people, people suffering from asthma, respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

Indoor pollution levels

The European Environment Agency (www.eea.europa.eu) has shown that indoor pollution levels are influenced by:

CARPETS

APPLIANCES

VENTILATION

AIR
QUALITY

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

CLEANING PRODUCTS

EXAMPLE PRODUCTS: FURNISHING

BEHAVIOUR example: smoking

MAINTENANCE
OF THE
BUILDING

The European Environment Agency has once again reiterated how in the past the issue of air pollution in confined spaces has received far less attention than the issue of air pollution in open spaces.
In recent years, however, the threats posed by exposure to air pollution in closed environments have become more evident.

These are all the polluting elements that undermine the healthiness of the buildings where today we spend about 90% of our lives

Related diseases

1

BRI

Who lives in buildings where the quality of the indoor air is awful, observes symptoms similar to the SBS ones, which are

  • Cough
  • Thoracic oppression
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fever
  • Shivers
  • Muscle pain

These people slowly improve their conditions after they leave the building.

2

ODTS

Toxic syndrome from organic dust occurs following exposure to confined environments with excessive concentration of fungi in the air, due to humidification systems contaminated by biological agents.

The symptomatology is similar to that of the flu and manifests itself a few hours after exposure with fever, malaise and difficulty in breathing. In addition, symptoms occur 4-8 hours after returning to the contaminated site after an absence of a few days and reduce within a week.

‘Extrinsic allergic alveolitis manifests itself with recurrent pneumonia or dyspnea attacks, also linked to flu-like symptoms.

The disease develops as an inflammatory reaction due to the presence of an allergen in the bronchioles and alveoli. It occurs in closed environments where the ventilation systems are contaminated by agents such as protozoa, fungi and bacteria.

Exposure to wood dusts, for example, may be responsible for the toxic organic dust syndrome (ODTS).

3

MCS

Multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome (MCS) or Environmental Idiopathic Chemical Intolerance (IIAAC) is a chronic disorder, reactive to chemical exposure, at lower levels than those generally tolerated by other individuals and in the absence of functional tests capable of explaining signs and symptoms.

Generally the symptomatology manifests itself after an exposure or a continued exposure to environmental agents, often noted as perception of one or more odors. However, sometimes a temporal relationship between symptomatology and exposure cannot be verified.

The symptom framework, which generally tends to recede following the removal of the chemical agent involved, includes numerous and specific disorders, affecting multiple organs. Generally, the nervous system and at least one other organ or system are involved.

The picture can present various degrees of severity, from malaise and discomfort up to a serious impairment of quality of life.

MCS symptoms

Other hypotheses believe that the syndrome is characterized by stress-induced disorders, mainly developed by the sensation of immediate danger, due to exposure to unknown substances, or that it is a complex psycho-somatic syndrome.

Some authors question the true existence of this disease as a pathological entity in its own right.

Chronic respiratory diseases

Among the chronic diseases affecting the world population, respiratory diseases, asthma and allergies represent a wide range of serious pathological conditions, forecast to increase in coming years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the increase in the frequency of these pathologies is correlated to changes in lifestyles, urbanization phenomena and the growing tendency of Western populations to live most of the time in closed (indoor), poorly ventilated environments, with hot-humid microclimates and presence of high levels of chemical pollutants and allergens.

Lately the attention of the scientific and institutional world has turned in a particular way to the problems related to the air quality of confined environments (indoor) and a growing sensitivity and awareness on the importance of health and comfort problems typical of confined environments has matured. A subject of particular interest and of considerable social importance is the relationship between indoor air pollution and the respiratory health of people who spend a lot of time indoors, living, leisure, study, work and transport.

Where air pollutants are present

In general, pollutants are present in indoor air in concentrations such that, although they do not cause acute effects, they are nevertheless the cause of negative effects on human well-being and health, especially if they are linked to an extended exposure time.

Complex mixtures of pollutants, even at low concentrations, can cause harmful effects on the health of susceptible people over time: children, pregnant women, elderly people, people suffering from asthma, respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

Indoor pollution levels

The European Environment Agency (www.eea.europa.eu) has shown that indoor pollution levels are influenced by:

CARPETS

DOMESTIC APPLIANCES

VENTILATION

AIR QUALITY

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

CLEANING PRODUCTS

CONSUMER'S PRODUCTS including furnishing items

HABITS AND BEHAVIORS, including smoking

MAINTENANCE OF THE BUILDING (ex. energy saving)

The European Environment Agency has once again reiterated how in the past the issue of air pollution in confined spaces has received far less attention than the issue of air pollution in open spaces.
In recent years, however, the threats posed by exposure to air pollution in closed environments have become more evident.

These are all the polluting elements that undermine the healthiness of the buildings where today we spend about 90% of our lives

Related diseases

1

BRI

Who lives in buildings where the quality of the indoor air is awful, observes symptoms similar to the SBS ones, which are

  • Cough
  • Thoracic oppression
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fever
  • Shivers
  • Muscle pain

These people slowly improve their conditions after they leave the building.

2

ODTS

Toxic syndrome from organic dust occurs following exposure to confined environments with excessive concentration of fungi in the air, due to humidification systems contaminated by biological agents.

The symptomatology is similar to that of the flu and manifests itself a few hours after exposure with fever, malaise and difficulty in breathing. In addition, symptoms occur 4-8 hours after returning to the contaminated site after an absence of a few days and reduce within a week.

‘Extrinsic allergic alveolitis manifests itself with recurrent pneumonia or dyspnea attacks, also linked to flu-like symptoms.

The disease develops as an inflammatory reaction due to the presence of an allergen in the bronchioles and alveoli. It occurs in closed environments where the ventilation systems are contaminated by agents such as protozoa, fungi and bacteria.

Exposure to wood dusts, for example, may be responsible for the toxic organic dust syndrome (ODTS).

3

MCS

Multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome (MCS) or Environmental Idiopathic Chemical Intolerance (IIAAC) is a chronic disorder, reactive to chemical exposure, at lower levels than those generally tolerated by other individuals and in the absence of functional tests capable of explaining signs and symptoms.

Generally the symptomatology manifests itself after an exposure or a continued exposure to environmental agents, often noted as perception of one or more odors. However, sometimes a temporal relationship between symptomatology and exposure cannot be verified.

The symptom framework, which generally tends to recede following the removal of the chemical agent involved, includes numerous and specific disorders, affecting multiple organs. Generally, the nervous system and at least one other organ or system are involved.

The picture can present various degrees of severity, from malaise and discomfort up to a serious impairment of quality of life.

MCS symptoms

Other hypotheses believe that the syndrome is characterized by stress-induced disorders, mainly developed by the sensation of immediate danger, due to exposure to unknown substances, or that it is a complex psycho-somatic syndrome.

Some authors question the true existence of this disease as a pathological entity in its own right.

THE SOLUTION

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